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EXPLOSIONS CALLED 'AN EPIDEMIC'

as reported by Juniper Rose of the Sacramento Bee newspaper.

Explosions, fires and hospitalizations stemming from homemade hash oil operations have led to a spike in prosecutions of hash oil manufacturers.

Read the full article here 

Report Receipt Date: JUN 30, 2014 
NHTSA Campaign Number: 14V381000 SUMMARY:

Nova Bus is recalling certain model year 2010-2014 LFS transit buses manufactured June 2010 to June 2014. In the affected vehicles, the terminal on the postive alternator cable may fracture causing the cable to arc to other components.

See the details at NHTSA

Recall Date: August 14, 2014
Recall Number: 14-256

Description:

This recall involves Vornado VH110 Whole Room Vortex electric space heaters sold in two colors, black and white.  The heaters measure about 10.5 inches high, 9 inches deep and 10.5 inches at the base growing narrower at the top.  The on/off switch and the high/low heat settings are located on top of the unit.  The Vornado logo appears with a gray “V” on the front of the unit. Recalled heaters have the numbers 1 and 3 as the fourth and fifth digits of the serial number.  The model and serial numbers appear on a silver decal located on the bottom of the unit.

See the complete details at CPSC

 

In the new issue of NFPA Journal®, President Jim Shannon said the Association will focus on the leading causes of home fires, including cooking. "We also need to continue to push hard for home fire sprinklers. That's still a large priority for NFPA, and we plan to work very aggressively in 2014 on our residential sprinkler initiative," he said.

Read more...

ABSTRACT

Many times, a fire investigator will conclude that a device was electrically energized at the time of a fire based on the presence of a bead on a wire.  If an energized device is present in the area of origin, it is likely that it will be considered as a potential cause of a fire.  Some training guides put forth that beads can only be formed from arcing on wires that were electrically energized when they were exposed to a fire or caused a fire.  Therefore, the presence or absence of a bead on a wire can have a strong influence on the direction of a fire investigation.  Hence, it is important to have a clear understanding of the various electrical and thermal conditions which can produce beads on electrical wires.

The main objective of this research was to determine, experimentally, if distinguishing characteristics exist between energized and non-energized wires subjected to various types of fire exposures.  The large majority of research published in the literature has not tested energized and non-energized wires under the same conditions.  A total of more than 190 wires were tested under various fire conditions.  Wire types included 12-gauge and 14-gauge solid conductors and 16-gauge and 18-gauge stranded conductors.  The tests were conducted using a bench-scale, premixed flame impingement apparatus, a bench-scale 125 kW/m2 radiant tunnel apparatus, a 2/5-scale flashover compartment, and a full-scale flashover compartment.  The use of various types of exposure conditions ensured that the characteristics on the wires (or lack thereof) were not caused by one specific type of thermal insult.  Wires were tested in both an energized and non-energized state.  Energized wires were tested under “load” and “no load” conditions.  Under load conditions, the energized wires were plugged into a 110-120 volt power source with 9 to 13 amps of current.  Under “no load” conditions, the wires were plugged into the power supply, but no current was flowing in the circuit. 

Click here to read the full article

Recall Date: August 7, 2014
Recall Number: 14-252

Description:

This recall involves lighted night stands sold in three different styles and finishes. The night stands are made of wood, have two drawers, a power strip on the back panel and a 20 watt halogen bulb on the underside of the bottom panel. Recalled models include: 244-421 Willow Run in a toffee finish, 245-421 Willow Run in a white finish and 237-420 Americana in a medium oak finish.  They measure about 22 inches wide, 16 inches deep and 27 inches high. “Lea” and the model number are printed on a label on the back of the night stands. There are two touch buttons on either side of the side panels which operate the nightstand’s lamp.

See full article at CPSC

Trivia

Trivia Questions of the Month

The trivia questions are not only fun but informative.  Who doesn't like learning something new, right?

Trivia question for August

The first propulsion means for fire pumps, whether they were hand or steamed powered, consisted of human beings pulling the pump.  Fire crews from the early 1900s were carried around by people, the apparatus had little room for personnel, they moved slowly and when they arrived at the scene, the firefighters were often too tired to do anything.  Luckily, in most cases, the fires died out before they even arrived, so there was little left for them to do.

Towards mid-1800s, and the age of steam, the introduction of the paid firefighters made room for horses to be largely put to use and pull the fire pumps.  This improved the response time of the fire brigades, but still didn't solve the firefighter transport issue.  People literally ran to the fires and, despite the fact that the pump was already there; they had some resting to do before getting to it.  The introduction of running boards and back steps, tail boards, later solved this problem as well.

The continuing development in fire-fighting technologies and equipment made life a lot harder for the horses.  The increase in weight of the fire engine slowly turned the horses as ineffective as the people were before them.  Often, after half a mile or so, the travel speed would decrease dramatically.  This called for a new means of propelling the engines.

Enter the self-propelled fire equipment.  The first self-propelled, steam powered fire engine in the US came to be in 1841 and it was built in New York.  Strangely enough, it didn't catch on.  Firefighters considered such a propulsion solution dangerous and unreliable.  It took decades before the steam powered fire engines really caught on.

However, the reign of the steam didn't last long.  Despite the fact that steam powered fire engines were still in use, here and there, up until the 1920’s, motorized fire trucks became more and more common by the early 1900’s.  Horse-drawn or steam powered engines started being turned into motorized fire engines.  By 1913, Ahrens-Fox Manufacturing Company from Cincinnati was the leading company when it came to the conversion.  From 1911, Mack Trucks began producing fire trucks, slowly becoming the most famous manufacturer in this field.

Many take the motorized fire equipment we use today for granted.  Yes it is big and shiny and very impressive, BUT, when was the first motorized fire engine used and where was it used?  What was the first fire department in California to become motorized?

I could ask that you trust to memory, but I know many will go to their computer for help. Good luck.

Click on any link below to find the trivia question and answer for that month.

 

 

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Pomona, California 91768 
Phone:  (909) 865-5004
Fax (909) 865-5024 
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