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This recall involves all models of single- and dual-purpose Coaire and Quietside brand tankless gas water heaters. The recalled water heaters heat either 4 or 7.2 gallons of water per minute. They are white and come in the following dimension ranges: 25-28 inches tall x 15-19 inches wide x 8-14 inches thick. The words “S-Line Condensing” are on the top front and brand names “Coaire” or “Quietside” are on the bottom front of the recalled water heaters.

Read the full article at CPSC

This recall involves air exchangers with and without heat recovery sold underdifferent brands that are used to circulate air in and out of the home.  The metal air exchangers are painted blue or grey. Air exchangers with heat recovery included in this recall were manufactured from January 2002 through May 2008 and have brand and model information written on a silver or black label on the outside panel. Air exchangers without heat recovery included in this recall were manufactured from January 2002 through July 2009 and have brand and model information printed on the unit's rating plate or imprinted on the side of the unit.

Read the full article at CPSC

This recall involves Cool Draft misting mid pressure and high pressure mistingfans. The misting fans fit on top of 15 gallon yellow or orange round Igloo coolers or on top of gray 40 gallon water tanks. Cool Draft by Ventamatic is printed on a sticker on the fan’s water tank and www.cooldraft.com is printed on a sticker in the center of all of fans.

See the full article at CPSC

In the new issue of NFPA Journal®, President Jim Shannon said the Association will focus on the leading causes of home fires, including cooking. "We also need to continue to push hard for home fire sprinklers. That's still a large priority for NFPA, and we plan to work very aggressively in 2014 on our residential sprinkler initiative," he said.

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Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology is rapidly becoming a preferred choice for battery power across all segments of society. This relatively new technology offers significant improvements in energy and power density over conventional battery technologies, such as alkaline and NiCad. In transportation vehicle applications, Li-ion batteries deliver more energy and power with less weight and maintenance than conventional batteries, making them a desirable choice of manufacturers.

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The Electric Grid: An Invaluable Utility Our nation’s expectation for reliable, uninterrupted electrical power to fuel all aspects of life—our business commerce, our homes, our hospitals, etc.—has escalated to such a high degree of confidence that we don’t give it a second thought. A large majority of the world’s population expects this vital necessity as a self-sufficient commodity, however invaluable it may be. Yet, when we examine the far reaching impact of the grid on the sustainability of our critical infrastructure we realize that this asset is far too valuable to settle for minimal security provisions.

Our nation’s expectation for reliable, uninterrupted electrical power to fuel all aspects of life — our business commerce, our homes, our hospitals,etc.— has escalated to such a highdegree of confidence that we don’t give it a second thought. A large majority of the world’s population expects this vital necessity as a self-sufficient commodity, however invaluable it may be. Yet, when we examine the far reaching impact of the grid on the sustainability of our critical infrastructure we realize that this asset is far too valuable to settle for minimal security provisions.

Read more... 

Trivia

Trivia Questions of the Month

The trivia questions are not only fun but informative.  Who doesn't like learning something new, right?

Trivia question for August

The first propulsion means for fire pumps, whether they were hand or steamed powered, consisted of human beings pulling the pump.  Fire crews from the early 1900s were carried around by people, the apparatus had little room for personnel, they moved slowly and when they arrived at the scene, the firefighters were often too tired to do anything.  Luckily, in most cases, the fires died out before they even arrived, so there was little left for them to do.

Towards mid-1800s, and the age of steam, the introduction of the paid firefighters made room for horses to be largely put to use and pull the fire pumps.  This improved the response time of the fire brigades, but still didn't solve the firefighter transport issue.  People literally ran to the fires and, despite the fact that the pump was already there; they had some resting to do before getting to it.  The introduction of running boards and back steps, tail boards, later solved this problem as well.

The continuing development in fire-fighting technologies and equipment made life a lot harder for the horses.  The increase in weight of the fire engine slowly turned the horses as ineffective as the people were before them.  Often, after half a mile or so, the travel speed would decrease dramatically.  This called for a new means of propelling the engines.

Enter the self-propelled fire equipment.  The first self-propelled, steam powered fire engine in the US came to be in 1841 and it was built in New York.  Strangely enough, it didn't catch on.  Firefighters considered such a propulsion solution dangerous and unreliable.  It took decades before the steam powered fire engines really caught on.

However, the reign of the steam didn't last long.  Despite the fact that steam powered fire engines were still in use, here and there, up until the 1920’s, motorized fire trucks became more and more common by the early 1900’s.  Horse-drawn or steam powered engines started being turned into motorized fire engines.  By 1913, Ahrens-Fox Manufacturing Company from Cincinnati was the leading company when it came to the conversion.  From 1911, Mack Trucks began producing fire trucks, slowly becoming the most famous manufacturer in this field.

Many take the motorized fire equipment we use today for granted.  Yes it is big and shiny and very impressive, BUT, when was the first motorized fire engine used and where was it used?  What was the first fire department in California to become motorized?

I could ask that you trust to memory, but I know many will go to their computer for help. Good luck.

Click on any link below to find the trivia question and answer for that month.

 

 

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Location

1279 North White Avenue 
Pomona, California 91768 
Phone:  (909) 865-5004
Fax (909) 865-5024 
8:00 am - 5:00 pm 
Monday - Friday

 

 

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