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Abstract

Based on data from the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA’s) National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA’s) annual fire department experience survey, NFPA estimates that during 2007-2011, local fire departments responded to an average of 334,200 brush, grass or forest fires per year. In most, less than one acre burned. These incidents accounted for 24% of all fires reported to local fire departments. This study examines the circumstances and causal factors of: a) brush or brush and grass mixture fires; b) grass fires; c) forest, woods, or wildland fires; and d) total brush, grass, and forest fires, including unclassified natural vegetation fires. One in five was intentionally set. The most common heat source was a hot ember or ashes. Open burning, high winds, and smoking materials were also frequent factors. Lightning accounted for a larger percentage of forest, woods, or wildland fires than the other types of natural vegetation fires.

AbstractBased on data from the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA’s) National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA’s) annual fire department experience survey, NFPA estimates that during 2007-2011, local fire departments responded to an average of 334,200 brush, grass or forest fires per year. In most, less than one acre burned. These incidents accounted for 24% of all fires reported to local fire departments. This study examines the circumstances and causal factors of: a) brush or brush and grass mixture fires; b) grass fires; c) forest, woods, or wildland fires; and d) total brush, grass, and forest fires, including unclassified natural vegetation fires. One in five was intentionally set. The most common heat source was a hot ember or ashes. Open burning, high winds, and smoking materials were also frequent factors. Lightning accounted for a larger percentage of forest, woods, or wildland fires than the other types of natural vegetation fires.

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Description

This recall involves two Scag Liberty-Z zero-turn lawn mowers; model SZL48-22KT with serial numbers K7100001 through K7102353 and model SZL52-24KT with serial numbers K7200001 through K7202020.  The model and serial numbers are printed on a vertical plate under the mower’s seat. “Scag” in red letters, “Liberty Z” in white letters and a blue “Z” is printed on a plate below the front of the seat. The mowers have an orange base with two orange and black steering handles. The mowers also have two large black with orange rim wheels in the back of the mower and two smaller black with orange rim wheels in the front of the mower.

 

Full details can be found at CPSC

Description

This recall involves SubstiTUBE IS T8 LED lamps. The recalled lamps are white, cylindrical in shape and measure 48 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. “OSRAM SubtiTUBE® IS LED T8” is printed on a silver label affixed to the end of lamps. The model number 73312-1 or 73315-1 also appears on the label beneath the statement “Compatible LED T8 for use with instant start T8 electronic ballasts.”

 

Full details can be found at CPSC.

In the new issue of NFPA Journal®, President Jim Shannon said the Association will focus on the leading causes of home fires, including cooking. "We also need to continue to push hard for home fire sprinklers. That's still a large priority for NFPA, and we plan to work very aggressively in 2014 on our residential sprinkler initiative," he said.

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NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations plays a fundamental role in fire and explosion investigations. A new edition of NFPA 921 is scheduled to be published in 2014. For years, this document has played a critical role in the training, education and job performance of fire and explosion investigators. It also serves as one of the primary references used by the National Fire Academy to support its fire/arson-related training and education programs. It is imperative that investigators understand the scope, purpose and application of this document, especially since it will be used to judge the quality and thoroughness of their investigations.

NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations plays a fundamental role in fire and explosion investigations. A new edition of NFPA 921 is scheduled to be published in 2014. For years, this document has played a critical role in the training, education and job performance of fire and explosion investigators. It also serves as one of the primary references used by the National Fire Academy to support its fire/arson-related training and education programs. It is imperative that investigators understand the scope, purpose and application of this document, especially since it will be used to judge the quality and thoroughness of their investigations.

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SAN DIEGO - A Team 10 and Scripps News investigation found arson fires are not investigated properly in many American cities -- including San Diego -- due to a chaotic patchwork of reporting systems and standards.

Many deliberately set building fires are not reported to the federal government.

Nationally, just 5 percent of all residential building fires are intentionally set, according to the National Fire Incident Reporting System, which is part of the Department of Homeland Security.  Data collected by Scripps News suggests the national arson rate to be significantly higher.

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Cooper Lighting Recalls Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures

RecallDescription

This recall involves indoor 2-light fluorescent light fixtures that range in size from 18 inches to 4 feet long. The fixtures were sold in white and can be mounted from heights between 8 and 12 feet. A date code between 182 11 (July 1, 2011) and 090 15 (March 31, 2015) is affixed to the fixture near the ballast in a DDD YY format. Catalogue and model numbers are located on the second line of a label affixed to the inside of the fixture. Catalogue and model numbers included in the recall: DLE217RLP, DLE217RLPB, DLE 232RLP, DLE232RLPB, SL232R, SL232R/1, SL232RPC, SL232RTP, SLNR232R, SLNR232R/1, SLNR232RCHR, SLW232R, SLW232R/1, SNF115R, SNF117R, SNF125R, SNF217R, SSF217R, WP217R, WP217RNKLLU, WP232R, WP232RLU, WP232RNKL, WP232RNKLLU and WP232RNKLRL.

 

Click here for full details from CPSC.

Code or standard?

What's the difference between a code and a standard?
Michael Heinsdorf, PE, LEED AP, CDT, ARCOM
07/01/2015

Almost every consulting engineer works with codes and standards on a daily basis, but do you know the difference between a code and a standard?

According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Circular No. A-119, Revised, a standard is "[t]he definition of terms; classification of components; delineation of procedures; specification of dimensions, materials, performance, designs, or operations; measurement of quality and quantity in describing materials, processes, products, systems, services, or practices; test methods and sampling procedures; or descriptions of fit and measurements of size or strength." In plain English, a standard consists of technical definitions, procedures, and/or guidelines that specify minimum requirements or instructions for manufacturers, installers, and users of equipment. This can be done by specifying either the methods or the results; the latter is known as "performance specifying." Most importantly, a standard provides standardization or agreement within the industry, which translates to a common reference among engineers, manufacturers, and bidders.

 

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White Paper: Revisiting Flammable Refrigerants

Introduction
Since the 1989 Montreal Protocol and its successor agreements, the world of
refrigerants has been marked by change. In the search for more environmentally-
preferable refrigerants, technology has moved from chlorofluorocarbons
to a host of alternative substances. Many of these substances are serving as
interim measures, until the phase-out of ozone-depleting and global-warming
refrigerants meets the targets set by the U.S. Clean Air Act. The journey toward
compliance has caused the HVAC equipment and appliance industries to revisit the
potential use of substances that have good environmental and thermodynamic
properties as refrigerants, but which are also, unfortunately, flammable.

Introduction

Since the 1989 Montreal Protocol and its successor agreements, the world of refrigerants has been marked by change. In the search for more environmentally-preferable refrigerants, technology has moved from chlorofluorocarbons to a host of alternative substances. Many of these substances are serving as interim measures, until the phase-out of ozone-depleting and global-warming refrigerants meets the targets set by the U.S. Clean Air Act. The journey toward compliance has caused the HVAC equipment and appliance industries to revisit the potential use of substances that have good environmental and thermodynamic properties as refrigerants, but which are also, unfortunately, flammable.

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Cree Recalls LED T8 Lamps

Description

This recall involves Cree LED T8 lamps used indoors to replace traditional two pin T8 fluorescent tubes. The white lamps have a cylindrical shape and measure 48 inches long. The affected units are marked as “BT848 Series Lamp” with the product part number on the lamp itself or printed on a white label affixed to the lamp. A four digit date code is printed on the lamp under a statement that reads “Compatible with Instant Start, Rapid Start and Dimmable Electronic Ballasts.”

 

Read the details at CPSC

IAAI - ITC 2015

IAAI President Peter Mansi welcomed everyone to the International Association of Arson Investigators 66th International Training Conference in Chicago, Illinois this past week, May 18th – 22nd.  Around 600 attendees were on hand for a great schedule of classes during the week.  Approximately 40 of those attendees were from Central America countries requiring translation throughout the week.  CCAI Director Robert Rullan gave a presentation on “CSI” as part of the training as well as assisting with the translation needs of the students.  

On opening day, CCAI’s 1st VP, Dale Feb, taught a four-hour class titled “Hearth Products Ignition Source or First Fuel Ignited”.  CCAI Member Steve Carmen taught two two-hour classes; “Math for Fire Investigators” and “Elevated Fire Origin Research”.  CCAI Member John DeHaan joined up with Instructors Chris Connealy and Kelly Kistner in presenting “Arson Convictions:  Reviewing the Science – The Texas Experience”.  Jamie and Cameron Novak were on hand to set things on fire in "Burn to Learn".  Rounding out the week was Mike Bryant teaching "Investigative Interviewing for Fire Investigations. Many other instructors joined in the training and in all, four separate tracks of education were presented throughout the weeklong conference.

CCAI President Eric Emmanuel represented the CCAI Chapter at the “Presidents Reception” on Sunday night, again during “Opening Ceremonies” on Monday Morning, at the “Chapters Presidents Luncheon” on Tuesday, during the IAAI “Annual General Meeting” on Tuesday afternoon and at the “Awards and Installation Banquet” on Tuesday night.  He was seen throughout the week engaging different individuals in conversations and promoting CCAI.

IAAI hosted a Vendor Room where approximately 30 different companies set up display booths and provided valuable information to the attendees.  A very active Spousal Program visited some of the many sights and attractions that Chicago has to offer.  Monday was spent at the Local Boutiques and Hummel Museum.  On Tuesday, the highlight of the week, they visited the Chicago Fire Academy and Fire Museum.  Wednesday and Thursday were spent exploring many of the hot spots around the “Windy City” including the Navy Pier, Sky Deck Chicago, Millennium Park and the Cloud Gate Sculpture, Art Institute Museum, Field Museum of Natural History, Museum of Contemporary Art, Shedd Aquarium and Adler Planetarium.  The week included lunches at the Hard Rock Café, Rainforest Café, and many of Chicago’s authentic hot dog and pizza restaurants.  Before departure on Friday, the group held a farewell breakfast at the hotel.  Approximately 28 people participated in the Spousal Program.

During the IAAI “Annual General Meeting”, elections were held.  Dan Heenan (Nevada) was sworn in as President, George Codding (Colorado) was sworn in as 1st VP and Scott Bennett (Ohio) was elected as 2nd VP.  Darrell Sanders (Louisiana), William T. Moreland (Florida) and Kevin Crawford (Colorado), Chris Van Vleet (Kansas) were elected to the serve three-year terms on the IAAI Board of Directors.  Joe Sesniak (Arizona) was elected to serve a three-year term on the IAAI Foundation Board of Directors, and David Snead (Texas) was reelected as president of the Foundation.  Immediately following the election, nominations were opened for 2016.  CCAI Board Member Robert Rullan was nominated to run for a Director Position next year.

CCAI members Troy Morrison, Jim Allen, Kathryn Varner, Don Perkins, Dennis Fields, Bill Kilpatrick and his wife Debbie, Tom Fee and others made a great showing for California Chapter 22.

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